Annual Report: 2020

Friends, each year you are kind enough to offer some financial support to my various map-related efforts, and in turn, as is my annual tradition, I want to be transparent in reporting back on what, exactly, those efforts were. With your support, in 2020, I was able to (in no particular order):

  • Organize How to do Map Stuff, a global festival of cartographic tutorial livestreams. This turned out far better than I had hoped, and was a highlight of the year. At one point there were over 400 concurrent people tuning in. Thank you to everyone who presented, watched, and spread the word. Most every presentation continues to live on YouTube, so make sure to check them out. Besides organizing things, I also wrote up a report afterwards on what it was like to organize something like this, in case you may find it valuable.
  • Continue my “Live Carto” series from 2019, with six new broadcasts. Some of these were tutorials/walkthroughs, and others were live looks at me working through a project in real-time. Thanks everyone who showed up! I have a few plans about how to keep these going in 2021.
  • Create a new mini-series: The Serene Practice. In a conversation with Meghan Kelly & Lauren Tierney, one of them mention (I can’t recall who) that people would watch a map being labeled. So, I put together a series of videos showing just that. There’s relaxing music, and the satisfaction of watching labels slide into place.
  • Make even more video content besides all that stuff listed above! 2020 was the year I started to learn Adobe Premiere and After Effects. I’m still a dabbler, but it’s been fun to play around with these two tools. As time goes on, I’m sure I’ll come up with new uses. For now, you can watch a spinning Mars globe that changes colors, and animations that show the geometric relationships between labels and features.
  • Send my cyanotype atlas on (what will eventually be) a world tour. Dozens of people signed up to receive my Atlas of Great Lakes Islands, and early in 2020, I sent it on its way and coordinated everyone to make sure it continued smoothly on its journey. However, it had only made about ten stops before I paused things due to COVID-19. While the atlas itself is unlikely to transmit the virus, I didn’t want anyone to have to make unnecessary trips to their local post office. So, it’s on hold until things improve. I look forward to restarting the tour in a few months!
  • Answer a lot of questions via email, Twitter DMs, YouTube comments, etc. People write to me each year asking for software help (especially Blender), career advice, interviews for school projects, or map critiques. I try to take the time to write back to everyone. It’s not really something I’d considered, when writing tutorials: the more resources you put out there, the more of these kinds of interactions they generate. I’m happy to help, and will try to keep up as long as the the volume remains manageable.
  • Conduct the second biennial Freelancer Survey with my colleague Aly Ollivierre, and special guest discussant Molly O’Halloran. Once again, we hoped to help empower carto-freelancers to know their worth by better understanding the state of the industry.
  • Keep my tutorials updated. As software changes, often these resources need updating to stay useful (it can be frustrating and confusing to read through a tutorial that doesn’t quite match what you’re seeing on screen). This time around, I needed to update my tutorial on Smart Type Halos to account for updates to Adobe’s interface.
  • Present at various (virtual) conferences. This year, I offered my thoughts on critique at NACIS 2020, in response to some of the unfortunate toxicity that’s been surfacing in our field. I also was honored to be invited to present at the 2020 Indigenous Mapping Workshop, where I gave a couple of tutorials on labeling and typography.
  • Create a bunch of random one-off mappy things that get released to the winds of Twitter. But, if you don’t want to search for them all, I’ve assembled most of them into a free PDF book: An Atlas of Minor Projects!
  • Continue my long tradition of pitching in to help NACIS, the main professional society for mappers in North America. It’s an all-volunteer organization, so the more we all help out, the better it becomes. In the last year I:
    • Served as a judge for the Atlas of Design
    • Served on the Diversity & Inclusion subcommittee
    • Joined the Nominations Committee
    • Helped oversee logistics details for getting reprints of the first three volumes of the Atlas of Design to customers
  • Coordinate a holiday shopping guide to boost the visibility of people who sell map-related products to consumers (posters, hiking maps, map apparel, etc.). Just a simple Google Doc, where people could sign up to list their map-related store. The link has been clicked over 1700 times. I think joining together has really helped boost our visibility.
  • Organize a nascent collective of map artists. It’s still very much in the early phases, but that shopping guide was the seed of an idea that I’ve long wanted to embark on: bringing together people who sell map products into a collective. A place where we can advertise our wares together, and have a bigger impact than if we were separate. A small group of us have organized as the Independent Map Artists, and hopefully you’ll hear more as time goes on.

It’s probably good for me to have written this, because 2020 was a challenging year, and this list makes me feel just a little bit better about how it all went.

Your patronage helps me justify taking time away from my freelance work in order to write, design, and help others. It also pays for things like conference fees, the cost of keeping this site ad-free, domain names, and other direct costs associated with all these side projects. Thank you for making this list possible!

As we move into 2021, I hope to continue to merit the support you have shown me. I never know exactly how much I’ll be able to do so in a given year, but I do know that I fully intend to keep up my efforts to contribute to the cartographic community. You have all taught me so much, and I will continue repay the favor as best I can.

If you’d like to support my ongoing work, one of the easiest ways you can do that is to spread the word — tell your friends and colleagues about my tutorials, YouTube videos, or whatever else you think they may like. And, if you’re in lending financial support to my efforts in the coming year, I have these two handy buttons for you!

One thought on “Annual Report: 2020

  1. Pingback: Financial Transparency: 2020 Edition | somethingaboutmaps

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